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Probiotics are "live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host."[1] In practice, it means that a killed bacteria cannot be considered a probiotic and, additionally, that a health benefit must be demonstrated in clinical trials. Saccharomyces boulardii can be considered a true probiotic as it is a live yeast whose efficacy has been demonstrated in more than 50 clinical and pharmacological trials.

1. FAO-WHO Guidelines for the Evaluation of Probiotics in Food 2002 Package Insert

S. boulardii is an effective anti-diarrheal agent (refer to the package insert for the mode of administration). S. boulardii is a live yeast, a specific strain of Saccharomyces that balances the naturally occurring intestinal microflora.

List of the excipients of the capsule: Lactose, sucrose (in capsules 50mg & 100 mg only), magnesium stearate, capsule shell.
List of the excipients of the sachet: Lactose, fructose, colloidal anhydrous silica, artificial tutti frutti flavor.

The production of S. boulardii is based on an original manufacturing process: lyophilization, a dehydration process that removes water from a substance. This lyophilization process is the only one that allows storage at room temperature and guarantees an optimal level of living cells when put into a suspension. Therefore, the clinical efficacy demonstrated in clinical trials is optimized.

S. boulardii from Biocodex is manufactured to exacting and certified pharmaceutical standards using the latest technologies and platforms. Manufacturing standards have been certified by appropriate health authorities and meet the GMP (good manufacturing practices).

Lyophilization is an original manufacturing process based on a dehydration process that removes water from a substance by transforming ice (solid state) directly into steam (gas state) without passing through its transitional liquid state. This lyophilization process is the only one that allows storage at room temperature and guarantees an optimal level of living cells when put into a solution. This process requires ultra-modern manufacturing technology and combined with Biocodex's S. boulardii high quality control (which adheres to Good Manufacturing Practices), the process guarantees a superior drug.

Lyophilization is an original manufacturing process used in many industries (pharmaceutical and biotechnology, vaccines and certain foods [instant coffee, astronaut supplies]) to make these products more stable. This lyophilization process is the only one that allows storage at room temperature and guarantees an optimal level of living cells when put into a solution. This process requires ultra-modern manufacturing technology and combined with Biocodex's S. boulardii high quality control (which adheres to Good Manufacturing Practices), the process guarantees a superior drug.

S. boulardii has been observed in the following ways:

A) Anti-toxinic: S. boulardii produces proteins, which work to neutralize bacterial toxins. This may include the toxins produced by Clostridium difficile.

B) Anti-microbial: S. boulardii adheres to pathogens, which decreases their adhesion to the intestinal wall and decreases invasion of enterocytes into the body. These pathogens are then removed during bowel movements.

C) Enzymatic activity: In healthy adults, S. boulardii increases the enzymatic activities (lactase, alpha-glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase).[1] The production of intestinal polyamines by S. boulardii is one of its most relevant and specific mechanisms of action. The polyamines spermidine, spermine, and putrescine enhance the expression of brush border enzymes (such as hydrolases, proteases, and transport molecules).[3]

D) Immune enhancement: S. boulardii helps prevent infection by stimulating the immune system along the GI lining by increasing the protective antibody IgA.

E) Anti-inflammatory: S. boulardii causes a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokines.

1. J.P. Buts & al. - PEDIATRIC RESEARCH 1986;20:192-196
2. J.P. Buts & al. - GUT 1999; 45:89–96
3. J.P. Buts & al. - PEDIATRIC RESEARCH 1994;36(4):522-527